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Invitation to the New England Future Faculty Workshop, July 10, 2018

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We received this invitation to join a workshop focused on academic ventures. If you’re interested, apply before May 1.


We invite you to participate in the New England Future Faculty Workshop for Underrepresented Groups in STEM Fields (NE-FFW) on the Northeastern University campus in Boston, Massachusetts on July 10, 2018.  The NE-FFW is designed specifically for underrepresented minorities and women in STEM fields who are late-stage PhD students and postdoctoral scholars and interested in an academic career.

 

The NE-FFW is focused on the academic job search.  The format of the one-day workshop includes faculty-led interactive discussions and peer-to-peer interactions.  Workshop topics include:  Finding Your Institutional Fit, Standing Out in the Interview, Reviewing CVs, Developing a Research Statement, Negotiating the Job Offer, and more.  To learn more about the New England Future Faculty Workshop for Underrepresented Groups in STEM Fields, go to: http://www.northeastern.edu/advance/recruitment/future-faculty-workshop/

 

To participate in the NE-FFW, there are several steps interested people need to take:

  1. Apply online by May 1, 2018.
    1. Submit a 300 word statement about why they want to participate
    2. Submit a CV
    3. Submit a diversity statement (1 page or less)
  2. Await notification of acceptance on May 16, 2018
  3. Confirm participation in workshop by paying a $50 registration fee by June 1, 2018

 

Please share this with colleagues. This unique opportunity is one you won’t want to miss.  We hope to meet you in Boston in July!

 

Warm regards,

NE-FWW Planning Committee

 

Northeastern University:

Penny Beuning, Associate Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology

Jan Rinehart, Executive Director ADVANCE Office of Faculty Development

Erinn Taylor de Barroso, Assistant Director ADVANCE Office of Faculty Development

Surviving the HR Screen from job posting to interview – advice from industry experts

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Learn about what happens on the other side when you submit your application for a job posting from seasoned industry experts! What is the best way to format your résumé so that it doesn’t get trashed?

 

 

 


Invited recruiters:

 

Alicia Rethage – Consults for biotech companies. Director of human resources.
Sean Conneely – Responsible for all recruitment in the US for Abcam. Also works as a freelance writer in his spare time.
  • What does Alicia consider is the purpose of the résumé?  Present yourself without the other person knowing. It has 3 parts to it:
    • Summary (objective) – the highlight, the advertisement of the Super Bowl. Has to be impacting. Catchy. Relevant to the job or what you’re looking for. It has to be clean, clear and have an impact to it.
      • Practice it. Give it to other people to critique.
    • Experience – in chronological order.
      • What is it that you’ve done? Write using active verbs. What was the problem, how did you approached it and what was the solution. How did you get there by doing that part?
  • What does Sean consider is the purpose of the résumé?
    • Lose the Objective section! He doesn’t want it to say what is your career goal down the road.
    • The Summary is key!
    • A résumé with more than 2 pages is a no no.
    • If you can’t get the attention from HR within the first 1-2 minutes they won’t go through it.
  • Sean: Accuracy on our résumé is important. Abcam uses Indeed, Glassdoor, Biospace, MassBio and even Craigslist!
    • They don’t have a keyword filter! He goes through every résumé, so make sure it is relevant and catchy because he doesn’t have time to go through all of them.
  • Alicia: Recruiters try to work as fast as they can. So the shorter that period is the more they make in terms of bonuses. The recruiter looks for quality. 
  • Submit your résumé the moment the job posting date is up, because that’s when the job is “hot”. If the job has been posted for too long it may be because they haven’t found a good person for it.
  • What is the window of time between posting and when someone should apply? 
    • Alicia: If you see the job today apply tonight, right away. Do not wait. You have to be the first one in line.
    • Sean: Do it quick, but you have to make sure your résumé is updated and your cover letter is perfect. If it’s ready to go, then apply as quick as you can.
  • How to format a résumé? How to take that job posting and how to market yourself well to what they’re looking for.
    • Sean: Filter out the first one or two tasks on the job posting that the company is looking for. Make that point in your summary or cover letter, and experience if possible. He’s not a big believer in buzzwords, but make sure to mention at least some keywords (i.e. skills/techniques) they’re asking for. 
      • Make sure to convey the fact that you can work well with others. 
      • If you don’t have a particular skill make sure that at least have some other skill that would show that you’re “trainable”.
    • Alicia: Spell out words that match the job description. Keywords/buzzwords have to be noticeable and repeat that one or two times so that the machine notices them (but no more than that because otherwise you would be wasting real estate in your résumé).
      • Résumé “real estate” is VERY valuable. Squeeze/shorten words to save space for other important things.
  • How many resumes are not qualified for the job?
    • Sean: 99% are not qualified.
      • For example: If there’s 8 bullet points for a job description, and you don’t feel confident covering the first 3 points then there’s a good chance you will not get the job. It would be a tough sell.
    • Alicia: Really read the requirements of the job posting. Otherwise you would be frustrated that you’re sending résumés out and you’re not being contacted.
  • What is the “affirmative action” plan?
    • Sean: Because they have government contracts they have to make sure they comply with covering diversity and equal opportunity for applicants.
  • General format of the résumé?
  • Alicia: Presentation is crucial. Make sure it doesn’t have different fonts. Has to have a consistent, organized format. No typos!
    • Make sure your skills are highlighted.
    • For her the general format of the résumé is:
      • Summary: Should be no more than 4-5 lines and very well-written.
      • Experience (no need to write “Research Experience”)
      • Education
  • Sean: Do not go crazy with attention-grabbing details. Keep the format traditional and make it consistent and formatted.
    • For him the general format of the résumé is:
      • Summary: Should be no more than 4-5 lines. Very well-written.
      • Experience (no need to write “Research Experience”)
      • Skills (if needed)
      • Education
  • How long does it take to screen a résumé?
    • Alicia: For a machine: 1 second. For a person: 15 seconds. Your résumé is your business card!
      • Have the important things highlighted at the very beginning of each section.
    • Sean: 15-20 seconds. For a low-level job: maybe 15 seconds. For a higher-level job: maybe 20 seconds or so.
  • Are volunteering opportunities important? Do they look at them?
    • Alicia: It has to be relevant for the job. Maybe include it under “Others” at the end of your résumé.
    • Sean: If it’s a “meaty” volunteer activity, like team-building, leadership, etc. then yes. This is not necessarily what’s going to get you the job.
  • Does it have to be written in short, snappy sentences since it’s given so little time to read it?
    • Alicia: Has to show that you know the words. 
      • Keep it relevant. Stay away from including citizenship, residency/visa status. Not that it’s not important, but no one’s asking (at least not yet).
    • Sean: For example, for the Summary section he wouldn’t make it choppy. He wants to see nice, fluid, coherent sentences. 
      • For PhD level job applicants: can you sell the experience you got out of your PhD? More important than just listing your publications. 2 pages is the norm when including your publications.
  • What about jobs that are not relevant to the job posting but that can spark the interviewers’ interest?
    • If it gets you “through the door”: yes!
  • First tense vs third tense?
    • Alicia: Third tense (i.e. “Recognized as …”). If you feel like you’re good at doing this then yes.
    • Sean: Use the one that sounds more like you or the one you think would best describe you. No right or wrong answer for this.
  • What should you NOT include in your résumé?
    • Sean: Personal information.
    • Alicia: Facebook (careful what you post! They can cross-reference your online presence. Your email address has to be professional. 
  • What should be included?
    • LinkedIn
  • Stemming from question above regarding citizenship status:
    • Sean: Citizenship status does not get asked about at first. Visas are an economic burden for companies, so maybe make clear in your application that you’re good with your application status if you don’t need it.
    • Alicia: Better don’t give that info on your application.
  • What about long-distance applicants?
    • There are some hiring managers that are reticent to hire someone from out of state. The hiring managers don’t care where you live, but they want to make sure you know that the job is not in some other place you would rather be. Make that point clear: establish on the cover letter why would you like to have this job.
  • What about a Scientist I position that requires 1-2 years experience?
    • Sean: Depends on the job description and the company.
    • Alicia: Having an internship counts as experience.
  • Inclusion of references on your résumé?
    • Sean: “Available upon request”
    • Alicia: “Available upon request”
  • Résumé critiquing
    • Sean: 
      • No need to put graduation dates because it tells them about your age. Companies are not required to ask this information.
      • Skills should not be too high up on the résumé. Abbreviate the ones that are relevant to the job posting.
      • If you include the name of a Professor make sure it’s someone that’s highly recognizable. Otherwise it doesn’t hurt, but it’s not necessary (saves you space if you take it out).
      • Avoid text-heavy résumés.
      • If having a significant postdoc experience then should be included above the Education section (as Experience).
      • Keep it on a legible font.
      • Recruiters don’t look at every single thing you’ve done, rather whether you can convey the important points.
      • If you’re sticking to a 2-page résumé and you have an extensive publication record, pick the 5 publications that are more recent. Can also highlight the fact that there are more.
      • Résumé doesn’t have to go that far back (i.e. if you’ve had many experiences). Keep it relevant and recent.
    • Alicia
      • You’re describing your job, but you should say what was your role (your contribution).
      • Start your résumé with your summary.
      • Computer skills are not necessary to include nowadays. Get rid of the numbering format on the Research Experience.
      • Professional summary should be a story, not bullet points.
      • Recognizable schools should be highlighted on the Education section.
      • The smallest font size should be a 9. She prefers a 10 or 11.
      • No need to distinguish between Experiences: Technical, Research or Work.
      • Do not include publications that are in preparation.
      • Pick the 5 most recent publications.
      • Don’t exaggerate something you don’t have. Don’t try to oversell it.
      • “Collaborated” is frequently used. She prefers “teamed up”.
      • Include name, address and phone number on every page of the résumé.
      • Every bullet point should be 1-2 lines only, 3+ bullet points.
      • “Interested” sounds like a hobby.

 

[Biocareers Seminar] Looking Your Best on Paper: Building a Resume and Cover Letter for Industry

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During this webinar hosted by BioCareers, Lauren Celano, founder of Propel Careers, covered tips on how to build an effective resume for industry. Click through to find out more!




Outline:

– Differences and similarities between resume and CV
– Content Advice
– Formatting Advice
– Resume examples
– What happens to your resume, CV and cover letter after you submit an application

– Differences and similarities between resume and CV

  Be succinct, include big picture summaries of your research
– Want to include a personal email address so that your email doesn’t bounce if you move institutions
– Important to tailor your research for each role as people may not be as familiar with the science



Resumes: Do not include:

– Picture
– Personal Information (DOB, family or relationship status)
– Be careful with hobbies: interesting hobbies are okay if they are inline with company culture (e.g. the whole office goes rock climbing) 

– Academic CVs do not show what you did and what techniques you did…  


 





– A resume provides more details that the reader can take away vs. a CV which does not provide a lot of clarity around what you have done. 
– In a resume, you get to choose to highlight what you choose to share among your experiences and should be really tailored to the position/industry you are applying for.   

What should you highlight?

 It depends on where you are applying!

Think about what you have done and how it can align with a future job!


 

 
10 seconds is the average time a HR person looks at your resume or CV!

How do you format your documents so that your application gets through the initial screening process?



– Number of pages depends on the field, finance etc, may be 1 page

Contact Info:
– Your name with credential (e.g. PhD), have a professional email, if you are international and have US citizenship/green card, PUT THIS ON YOUR RESUME otherwise they may assume you cannot legally work in the US. 

– Summary of Qualifications (vs. Objective – as this may change)
– What are the top 3 things you want people to know about your qualifications? Science skills, leadership, management etc.

Example for industry R&D scientists:

 
* tailored to the job ad! If they use specific abbreviations, you should use them, otherwise spell everything out. 
 
Experience section: 
– Paid Experience
– Undergrad/Postgrad/Postdoc Experience
– One sentence description of your research which includes your PI’s name, as this may be a point of connection. 
 
 


Wording matters – e.g. “Research studies the role of XXY with an emphasis on key proteins such as A and B”. — vs. “Research studies chronic X disease and the role of key proteins in XX environment”.  Make it easier to understand!! 


– Sub headings can be useful!! Different strategies:

 

 


Resume Examples:

– Small company biotech
 Values grants and appreciates entrepreneurial mindset
 Highlight project leads, business-orientated competitions and diagnosis



– Non-bench application:
 Collaborations, not highlighting techniques 


– Business Development Roles:
 Highlights business experience over research experience
 



For bench roles:

– List your experience and what you want  to do. If you don’t want to do animal work etc, don’t list it!


For non-bench roles:
– List other skills, i.e. imaging software, statistical software etc

Education: 



Additional Selections:



Resume formatting:

– Have someone else review your resume, outside your field for several reasons:
   1. Wording is okay and understandable to outsiders
2. Details!!! Formatting is correct: bullet points are aligned, etc 

If using 2 pages, use a full second page. i.e. try not to squish sections, add other sections if you need to overflow. Use all the space you have! 
– Use bullet points and formatting to help focus attention! Rolls of text is hard to read and focus on. 

Writing a cover letter:



Often cover letters get separated from resumes, so make sure you list contact info!
Indicate you have read the job description, so tailor the cover letter! It’s okay to reiterate job requirements from the job ad.
Focus on the items mentioned that you KNOW they want and don’t waste space talking about irrelevant items.

Example:

 



What happens to your job application?
– Not everyone gets both cover letter and resume (or reads them).

1. HR Person – gets both resume and cover letter, reads cover letter
2. Hiring Manager – maybe gets both, reads resume
3. Interviewers – resume, perhaps very late. Don’t usually get the cover letter.

 Thus, its okay to repeat/reiterate what is in the cover letter and ensure you cover the important points of how you fit the job in both!


 

 Question: How often do people looked at LinkedIn?
Answer: ALL THE TIME! If you are on LinkedIn, you want to have a professional photo that makes you look approachable, a good summary of your background and if you can, mention what you are looking for, career wise.

Question: How do you design your resume if you are switching fields where you may not have a lot of existing skills?
Answer: Focus on the transferrable skills!

Question: How long it take from submission to job offer.
Answer: 1.5 – 3 months typically. Once you submit it can take 1 day to 2 weeks to contact you initially (and may contact you up to 6 months later!).